Tag Archives: Daniel Fast

bobota

Simple Greek “Peasant” Cornbread (Bobota)

Simple Greek “Peasant” Cornbread (Bobota)

In Greek, the word bobota can mean anything from cornmeal to any bread or polenta-type dish made with cornmeal. In Greek history, during times of hardship, cornmeal recipes were very popular, and bobota is considered by many to be a “peasant” dish. This recipe gets a delightful shot of flavor from fresh orange juice and produces a dense, crumbly cornbread.

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups cornmeal (I use fresh ground popcorn)
1 ¼ teaspoons baking powder or baking soda *
¼ cup honey
4-5 tablespoons of fresh orange juice (juice of ½ large orange)
¼ cup of extra virgin olive oil
1 cup lukewarm water

SUPPLIES:

Bowl/whisk for dry ingredients

Small bowl for wet ingredients

Measuring cups/spoons

9-inch pie plate

PREPARATION:

Grease the pie plate.

DIRECTIONS:

Whisk together the cornmeal, sugar, and baking powder to combine well. In a separate bowl, mix oil, orange juice, and water, and stir until well blended. Add liquids to the dry ingredients and stir.

Pour batter into a well-oiled 9-inch pie pan and bake for 40-45 minutes. Test for doneness by inserting a toothpick into the center of the pan. It should come out dry.

Cool at least 10 minutes before cutting. Serve warm or at room temperature.

YIELD:

One 9-inch pie pan (4-8 pieces) of simple country cornbread

NUTRITION: ~*~
No cholesterol
Very low in sodium
NUTRITION FACTS:
~*~
NOTES:

In Greek: μπομπότα, pronounced bo-BOH-tah

This recipe sizes very well. To increase the yield, increase all ingredients proportionately.

Baking powder is double-acting, meaning that it causes a rise during preparation and again during baking. Baking soda causes a one-time rise. The bobota will reflect a slight difference, depending on which is used.

I would love to hear any feedback about this recipe. Did you make it? Did you enjoy it? Did you make any adjustments to it?

Hallee


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Menu Monday

Menu Monday 18 JUN 12 — Daniel Fast Week 2

Menu Monday

Menu for the week of June 18, 2012.

The “rules” of our household diet can be found in the tab above labeled Hallee’s Galley and further explained in Our Diet.

I usually serve leftovers for lunch the next day, or we’ll save them during the week to graze lunch on the weekends. One meal a week, we eat whatever we want. This is usually our “Dinner Out” meal.

Almost all of the breads are homemade using fresh milled flour. I’ll continue to link to my recipes as I post them. Our daily bread is Whole Wheat Honey Oatmeal Bread.

Here’s the menu for my family for the week of June 18th.

Gregg and I have felt the need to fast for several weeks now, but we were crazy around here with the end of school and getting books released. So, we’re starting the fast last week. The reason for the timing is this: this is seriously the only chunk of summer that isn’t rife with military training for the national guard or summer camps, etc., for our ministries. If we were going to fast this summer, it has to start now.

We are doing Daniel Fast. My blog post about that can be found here, but basically, it’s vegan extreme – and I’m throwing in my own personal restriction to unleavened bread only. Last week, Gregg did a juice fast during the day and ate vegan soups in the evening.  This week he’s in line with me on a regular Daniel Fast.

On Saturday, we are having the boys’ birthday party.  My parents and my sister and her family will be in town.  I haven’t really felt tempted by food this fast, but we’ll see how I do with full meal preparations, homemade ice cream, and birthday cake!


Monday:

Breakfast:

grapefruit, raw almonds
The children will be getting scrambled eggs & turkey bacon.

Lunch:

Baked potato seasoned with black pepper and salt, salad with lemon juice and olive oil

Dinner:

Yesterday, we made a potato soup using rice milk.  We added sweet potatoes and carrots to the basic potatoes, celery, and onion soup.  It was really good.  We’re having leftovers, with a salad.  The boys will have bread and butter with theirs.

Tuesday:

Breakfast:

oatmeal with dried fruit
The children will have toast as well

Lunch:

Hummus with Sunflower Seed Paste, Greek salad with kalamata olives, Whole Wheat Tortillas

Dinner:

Black beans & Perfect Brown Rice, Sautee’d Summer Vegetables, salad.  The children will have beef sausage with that.

Wednesday:

Breakfast:

bananas and a spoonful of unsweetened peanut butter
The children will have scrambled eggs and Southern Cheese Grits

Lunch:

Mixed greens salad with melon and sliced almonds

Dinner:

Spaghetti (I will make this sauce, but leave out the meat), whole wheat pasta, and salad.

Thursday:

Breakfast:

Mango and banana smoothie (made with coconut milk)
The children will have cold cereal

Lunch:

Black beans & Perfect Brown Rice, salsa, Whole Wheat Tortillas

Dinner:

Wild Rice Stuffed Butternut Squash, kidney beans,  Perfect Brown Rice, salad.

The children will also have baked chicken legs.

Friday:

Breakfast:

baked oatmeal

Lunch:

salad, guacamole, tortilla chips

Dinner:

Tacos made with Homemade Refried Beans and Corn Tortillas.  Guacamole (recipe to follow)

Saturday:

Breakfast:

fresh fruit and dried nuts
The children will have cold cereal

Lunch:

Hummus with Sunflower Seed Paste, Greek salad with kalamata olives, Whole Wheat Tortillas

Dinner:

Dinner out

Sunday:

Breakfast:

The children will also be having beef bacon

Lunch:

Vegetarian Quesadillas (grilled vegetables inside grilled tortillas — no cheese), guacamole

We will be serving lunch to the birthday party guests consisting of roast beef sandwiches, turkey sandwiches, fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, chips, homemade ice cream, birthday cake

Dinner:

Very Chunky Vegetarian Chili

I’ll be roasting a turkey and making sweet potatoes, fresh green beans, Wonderful Whipped Potatoes, Turkey Gravy, and Granny Everman’s Yeast Rolls for my visiting family

Hallee


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Menu Monday

Menu Monday 11 JUN 2012 – Daniel Fast Week 1

Menu Monday

Menu for the week of June 11, 2012.

The “rules” of our household diet can be found in the tab above labeled Hallee’s Galley and further explained in Our Diet.

I usually serve leftovers for lunch the next day, or we’ll save them during the week to graze lunch on the weekends. One meal a week, we eat whatever we want. This is usually our “Dinner Out” meal.

Almost all of the breads are homemade using fresh milled flour. I’ll continue to link to my recipes as I post them. Our daily bread is Whole Wheat Honey Oatmeal Bread.

Here’s the menu for my family for the week of June 11th.

Gregg and I have felt the need to fast for several weeks now, but we were crazy around here with the end of school and getting books released.  So, we’re starting the fast this week.  The reason for the timing is this: this is seriously the only chunk of summer that isn’t rife with military training for the national guard or summer camps, etc., for our ministries.  If we were going to fast this summer, it has to start now, and will unfortunately collide with the combination birthday party we’re throwing for the boys at the end of the month.  But, it will be the end of the fast, so we’ll be in a good stride by then.

Yesterday, I started a 21-Day Daniel Fast. My blog post about that can be found here, but basically, it’s vegan extreme – and I’m throwing in my own personal restriction to unleavened bread only. Gregg is actually doing a juice fast during the day and eating vegan soups in the evening, so you’ll see pretty much only soups as our evening meals.

This week is also VBS at church.  I’m working in the kitchen, so the temptation to eat foods not on the fast is going to be great — especially with this being the first week of the fast.


Monday:

Breakfast:

oatmeal with dried fruit
The children will be getting toast with that.

Lunch:

Baked potato seasoned with black pepper and salt, salad with lemon juice and olive oil

Dinner:

The children will eat the dinner prepared at church.

Gregg will be taking Hearty 16-Bean-Soup to feed the volunteers for our weekly work with Glen Eden Youth Center.

Tuesday:

Breakfast:

grapefruit, raw almonds
The children will have turkey bacon and scrambled eggs

Lunch:

Hummus with Sunflower Seed Paste, Greek salad with kalamata olives, Whole Wheat Tortillas

Dinner:

Crockpot Vegetable Soup (made like Crockpot Vegetable Beef Soup but with no beef) and salad. I will probably add some Great Northern Beans to the crockpot just to add some protein.

The children will eat the dinner prepared at church.

Wednesday:

Breakfast:

bananas and a spoonful of unsweetened peanut butter

Lunch:

Mixed greens salad with melon and sliced almonds

Dinner:

Black Beans Tortilla Soup (and a salad for me)

The children will eat the dinner prepared at church.

Thursday:

Breakfast:

Oatmeal with dried fruit and pecans
The children will have theirs’ sweetened with maple syrup

Lunch:

Black beans, brown rice, salsa, Whole Wheat Tortillas

Dinner:

Very Chunky Vegetarian Chili

The children will eat the dinner prepared at church.

Friday:

Breakfast:

fresh fruit and nuts

Lunch:

salad, guacamole, tortilla chips

Dinner:

Fresh Tomato Soup

The children will eat the dinner prepared at church.

Saturday:

Breakfast:

fresh fruit and dried nuts

Lunch:

Hummus with Sunflower Seed Paste, Greek salad with kalamata olives, Whole Wheat Tortillas

Dinner:

Vegetable and Navy Bean Soup (recipe to follow)

The children will also be having grilled cheese sandwiches

Sunday:

Breakfast:

Oatmeal with dried fruit and nuts

Lunch:

Vegetarian Quesadillas (grilled vegetables inside grilled tortillas — no cheese), guacamole

Dinner:

Hearty 16-Bean-Soup

The children will also be having cornbread and salad

Hallee


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fresh pico de gallo

Fresh & Flavorful Pico de Gallo

Fresh & Flavorful Pico de Gallo

My daughter Kaylee LOVES fresh pico de gallo.  She’ll sit with a huge bowl of it and a bag of organic tortilla chips and just inhale it.  And because of the health benefits to the fresh salsa, I don’t discourage it.  With fresh tomatoes, fresh peppers, and fresh onion, the vitamins and minerals can’t be beat.  In running the nutritional analysis of the recipe, this is what I discovered.  Fresh Pico de Gallo is has no cholesterol, is low in sodium, very high in dietary fiber, high in manganese, high in magnesium, high in niacin, high in phosphorus, very high in potassium, high in thiamin, very high in vitamin A, very high in vitamin B6, and very high in vitamin C.

It’s also REALLY easy.  I make it all summer long straight out of my garden.

INGREDIENTS:

4 tomatoes
1 medium onion
2 fresh jalapeño peppers
¼ cup fresh cilantro
juice of 1 lime (about 2 TBS)

SUPPLIES:

sharp knife/cutting board
chopper (not mandatory, but I prefer it)
large bowl
spoon

PREPARATION:

Juice the lime

DIRECTIONS:

Chop the tomatoes.  I prefer to use my chopper, so that I have small, even pieces.

Chop the onion.

Chop the jalapeños — make sure you wear a glove to handle the peppers.

Chop the cilantro.

Mix all of the vegetables with the lime juice.

Serve.

YIELD:

4 servings

NUTRITION: ~*~
Very low in saturated fat
No cholesterol
Low in sodium
Very high in dietary fiber
High in manganese
High in magnesium
High in niacin
High in phosphorus
Very high in potassium
High in thiamin
Very high in vitamin A
Very high in vitamin B6
Very high in vitamin C
~*~
NOTES:

I would love to hear any feedback about this recipe. Did you make it? Did you enjoy it? Did you make any adjustments to it?

Hallee


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Meat Vintage Sign

Dear Hallee: Eating Dairy & Meat

Hallee the Homemaker Helps

Hallee the Homemaker Helps

What are your thoughts on dairy and meat? I am so confused about it all, there is so much conflicting info out there.

As much as I wish otherwise, there isn’t a simple answer to this question.

In the beginning of the 20th century, Americans consumed, on average, 120 pounds of  meat annually.  In 2007, the average American ate 222 pounds of meat in a year.

In 1913, the average American consumed  40 pounds of processed sugar, on average, annually.  In 1999, the average American consumed 147 pounds of refined sweeteners.

In 1909, Americans consumed, on average, 294 pounds of dairy per year.  In 2006,  the average American consumed 605 pounds of dairy.

That’s a significant increase in the span of just a few generations!

What changed?

Fish Vintage Sign

Meat Goes to War

Post World War II brought us burger joints and supermarkets.  Supermarkets were stocked with “convenience foods” – processed delicacies designed to make life easier.  Cheeseburgers, tacos, deep fried butter on a stick – food became starchy, fatty, salty, and processed.  By the 1960′s heart disease was on the rise.

More than 40% of Americans are obese, and over 50% take some form of prescription drug for a chronic disease every day.  There are unprecedented amounts of Type II diabetes in children, and we are now seeing hypertension in children in grammar school.  Lipitor, a cholesterol medicine, is the most prescribed drug in the world.  The generation growing up today will be the first generation of children in the United States to live less time than their parents. 500,000 Americans a year have bypass surgery.  Every minute, a person in the United States is killed by heart disease.  Three hundred people a day die from cancer.  Combined, over one million Americans die every year from either cardiovascular disease (heart attacks, strokes) or from cancer.

We spend $2.2 trillion dollars a year on healthcare – over five times that of the defense budget.

First do no harm … Let your food be your medicine and medicine be your food.  ~Hipocrates

During WWII, Nazis invaded Norway.  When they did this, they confiscated all of the livestock to feed their own troops.  The Norwegians, in turn, were under strict rationing with their sugars and fats.  They had to turn to fruits, vegetables, and fish for sustenance.

Heart disease plummeted during the war.  When the war was over, it rose back to pre-war levels.

Meat Vintage SignIn 1974, China did a massive cancer study – the biggest study ever of its kind (The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted And the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, And Long-term Health).  600,000 scientists tracked mortality rates due to different kinds of cancer all over China.   Using this study as a guide, in 1980, scientists did a more focused study on 65 rural areas of China and discovered 94,000 correlations between diet and cancer.

The doctor of the future will no longer treat the human frame with drugs, but rather will cure and prevent disease with nutrition.  Thomas Edison

What scientists are discovering is that a whole-foods, plant based diet can not only stop the course of many chronic diseases, but can actually reverse them.

One of the benefits is, obviously, weight loss and weight maintenance.  500 calories of natural plant food (cereal grains, vegetables, fruit) will fill your stomach, triggering density receptors (which help your brain determine caloric density) and the stretch receptors (which help your brain measure the volume of food in your stomach), thus allowing you to feel full.  But, 500 calories of unnaturally rich or processed foods (think Krispy Creme donuts or Chef Boy Ardee) does not fill our stomach and tricks our bodies into thinking we need to eat more.  We almost have to over eat in order to feel satisfied.

Overeating will cause weight gain.  Weight gain leads to obesity.  Obesity causes blood pressure problems, cholesterol problems, diabetes, stroke, heart attacks, cancers…the list can go on.

But, it’s a balancing act, like everything.  Let’s take just cholesterol.  Too low of cholesterol, and you are at risk for cancer, mental illness, infections, etc.  Too high of cholesterol, and you’re at risk of cancer, heart disease, etc.  Cholesterol is found in animal fats.  (Some plants have cholesterol, but their numbers are minuscule.)

Dairy Vintage Sign

Is it really "Farm Fresh" if it's homogenized?

Part of my study on this topic included the Bible.  What does God say about it?  Adam and Eve and their following generations all the way to Noah did not eat meat.

God gave Noah and his family meats to eat — that is the first time eating meat is mentioned in the Bible.  With Moses, God specified which meats were clean for consumption. When the Israelites were wandering in the desert, God said to them, “At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall be filled with bread.”  God sent quails in the evening and manna in the morning.  The father of the prodigal son killed the fatted calf for the celebration of his son’s return.  When Jesus appeared to seven of his disciples after his death, they’d been fishing all night, having caught nothing.  Jesus told them to throw their nets over one side, and they caught so much fish that they could not even pull the nets up.  Jesus met them on the shore and cooked fish for breakfast.

Best I can tell, God approves the eating of “clean” meats.

Milk is used throughout the Bible as a positive substance.  Cheese is mentioned.  Never is it forbidden.  “He nourished them…with curds and milk from herd and flock…” Deuteronomy 32:13-14.   However, the dairy that we have today in our culture is a bastardized version of the kind of dairy my mother had growing up.

Today, cows producing the milk on mega factory farms are not healthy – they don’t wander free in the fields eating grass and making their way to the barn at milking time.  They stand in a milking barn their entire lives and eat corn and grain pumped full of industrial grade chemicals (euphemistically called vitamins), steroids, and other hormones.  Milk today is pasteurized and homogenized, processes that destroy the vitamins and denature the proteins in the milk.

DairyRaw milk is neither pasteurized nor homogenized; however, in the last 40 years it has become illegal to purchase raw milk in many states.  I cannot purchase raw milk here in Kentucky.  I can, however, find non-homogenized, low-temperature pasteurized milk.  When I cannot get that, I use organic cream and organic fat-free milk and “make” my own whole milk – which is the best I can do with what I have.

Good dairy, raw dairy, free-range dairy, goat dairy — those are good, God given, healthy foods.

What is my take?  To what conclusions have Gregg and I come?

As impressive as the study in China was, the standard diet for China is full of pork and shellfish. The same thing goes for the Scandinavian countries – a massive consumption of pork. I’d love to see a study in the same sphere with an area that largely follows a Levitical diet – Israel for instance. Or even a diet that just removes pork – like areas in the Middle East.

According to the studies, plant based, whole food diets prove to be healthier to entire populations. I think another thing to also point out is that there weren’t processed soy products in the Scandinavian countries at the time. So, when the animals were gone, the population was left with sustaining themselves with plant based whole foods. No artificial products, no soy based products, no processed and refined to the point of obscenity foods. And, I think importantly, they increased their fish intake by 200%

Fish

Fresh Salmon is a Favorite

I believe that a vegan diet – and that is a diet that is all vegetarian – all plant based with no animal products at all is only a healthy choice when there are no processed and artificial foods, no processed soy-based proteins introduced regularly into the diet. When the consumer is knowledgeable about what to eat to attain maximum protein and nutritional consumption, then it can be a moderately healthy diet.  However, we believe that at least dairy is necessary for all around health.

As a society, we consume entirely too much meat and meat products. This became apparent to Gregg and I when we were finishing our Daniel Fast in October and November. I had no real desire to return to eating meat. It occurred to me that I could very happily continue on as a vegetarian if I also ate dairy products.

Gregg and I have spent many hours researching this topic and have concluded that we are going to drastically cut back on our meat consumption. We’ve made a big change and are only eating meat twice a week for breakfast and no more than three times a week for dinner – with at least one of those meals being fish. We feel that this is an incredibly healthy change for our family.

Meat

Beef, Lamb, Bison, Chicken, Duck

That said, we only eat good meats – and those meats that are approved in God’s dietary laws. When we purchase those meats, we purchase good meat – grass fed beef, free range poultry, local organic lamb, wild caught seafood. Complimenting the meat are good, whole foods – non-processed, non-refined, whole grains, good-for-you foods.

When we purchase dairy, we purchase good dairy — no raw milk can be sold in our state, but I buy local non-homogenized, low-temperature pasteurized milk. I make my own yogurt. We purchase organic cheeses and local cream.

We do our best to make sure that our dairy products are as good as we can get without making our own (and that will come one day.)  When we eat out, we try to stick to vegetarian menus, because we don’t know the sources of the meat and the dairy.

So, the question: Is it okay to eat meat and dairy?

It really depends. Are you buying “Value Chicken” label from Mega-Lo-Mart and serving it with a side of boxed (processed) mac & cheese and frozen cauliflower drowning in processed cheese sauce? Then, no, it’s not really okay to eat that. It’s actually bad for you to eat that.

Are you, one or two nights a week, eating locally raised grass-fed lamb, homemade hummus, homemade whole wheat pita bread, with a side of Greek salad and some organic Feta cheese crumbled on top?

Then, yes, that is very good for you.

Hallee


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Good Friends

Last Monday, Gregg and I finished our 40-day Daniel Fast. For 40 days, we ate nothing but whole food fruits, vegetables, and some whole grains.  To drink, we only had water.

We have good friends who come to our weekly small group in our home every Sunday night, and we had joked about missing chocolate and coffee more than anything.

Monday morning, when I came home from my pre-dawn run, I found this package on my doorstep.

It contained three flavors of coffee and four amazing chocolate bars.

The note was signed by a couple who comes to our small group.

What a beautiful gesture of love from such a wonderful couple.

 

Hallee


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Ratatouille

Crockpot Ratatouille

Crockpot Ratatouille

I’d never made Ratatouille before, but my friend Jen (who has posted recipes here for me before) often does and I know her family likes it.  As I was preparing the vegan menu last week for our Daniel Fast, Ratatouille came to mind and I decided to give it a go.  This was an amazing recipe.  The flavors are so fresh.  There’s something specific about the layering of the veggies and the order in which you layer them that makes the dish so good.  We served it over brown rice, but you could serve it alone, over pasta, over bread – anything, really.

INGREDIENTS:

2 large onions
1 large eggplants
4 small zucchini
2 garlic cloves
2 large green bell peppers
2 large tomatoes
1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
2 TBS fresh basil
1 TBS fresh oregano
1 tsp sugar
2 tsp salt
½ tsp black pepper
¼ cup fresh parsley
¼ cup olive oil

SUPPLIES:

sharp knife/cutting board
measuring spoons
crockpot

PREPARATION:

Slice the onions, eggplant, and zucchini.

Mince the garlic.

Cut the peppers into strips.

Cut the tomatoes into wedges.

DIRECTIONS:

In your crockpot, layer in this order:

Half of the Onions

Half of the Eggplant

Half of the Zucchni

Half of the garlic

Half of the green pepper

Half of the tomatoes

Half of the herbs, salt, and pepper

Dot with half of the tomato paste

Repeat the layers.

Drizzle with the olive oil.

Cook in the crockpot on low heat for 7-9 hours.

 

YIELD:

8 Servings

NUTRITION: ~*~
No cholesterol
High in dietary fiber
High in manganese
High in potassium
Very high in vitamin A
High in vitamin B6
Very high in vitamin C
~*~
NOTES:

We served it over brown rice, but you could serve it alone, over pasta, over bread – anything, really.  I would love to hear any feedback about this recipe. Did you make it? Did you enjoy it? Did you make any adjustments to it?

Hallee


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Menu Monday

Menu Monday 31 OCT 2011 – Daniel Fast Week 4

Menu Monday

Menu for the week of 31 October 2011

The “rules” of our household diet can be found in the tab above labeled Hallee’s Galley and further explained in Our Diet.

I usually serve leftovers for lunch the next day, or we’ll save them during the week to graze lunch on the weekends. One meal a week, we eat whatever we want. This is usually our “Dinner Out” meal.

Almost all of the breads are homemade using fresh milled flour.  I’ll continue to link to my recipes as I post them.  Our daily bread is Whole Wheat Honey Oatmeal Bread.

Here’s the menu for my family for the week of October 31st.

Our church is currently observing 40 days of fasting, and Gregg and I decided that we would do a Daniel Fast.  For the next few weeks, you will see a “vegan extreme” diet.  We are consuming only fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and drinking only water – no sugars, honey, syrups, nor eating leavened bread.  Kaylee is observing her own form of this fast and will be abstaining from the sugars and the meat – she will be consuming dairy, however.  The boys will be eating our meals with us, but will have some meat and will have dairy.

For breakfast, we are making a juice in our juicer out of kale, carrots, apples, and fresh ginger root.  Several good juice recipes can be found here.  I’ve also been making smoothies out of mango, fresh pineapple, bananas, oatmeal, flax seed, and coconut milk.  We drink one or both of them for our breakfast.

For lunches, we will be eating hummus with fresh vegetables, avocado and salsa in Ezekiell 4:9 tortillas (the only tortillas I could find with nothing in them but grains), salads, or something like unsweetened peanut butter and bananas with tortillas.

I pray that by sharing our journey with you, you will receiving a blessing from it.


Monday:

Breakfast:

scrambled eggs, turkey bacon, fresh fruit

Dinner:

Crockpot Vegetable Soup, garden salad

Tuesday:

Breakfast:

Perfect Baked Oatmeal with dried fruit and nuts

Dinner:

Vegetable Stir Fry, Perfect Brown Rice, garden salad

Wednesday:

Breakfast:

Dinner:

Very Chunky Vegetarian Chili, garden salad

Thursday:

Breakfast:

cream of wheat, beef sausage, fresh fruit

Dinner:

Taco Dinner with Homemade Refried Beans (made with olive oil instead of beef bacon fat)

Friday:

Breakfast:

corned beef hash, fried eggs, fresh fruit

Dinner:

Dinner Out – Scott’s school is having a dinner/silent auction fund raiser

Saturday:

Breakfast:

cold cereal, fresh fruit

Dinner:

Crockpot Ratatouille (recipe to follow), Perfect Brown Rice, garden salad

Sunday:

Breakfast:

scrambled eggs, toast,  fresh fruit

Dinner:

Small group in our home.  I provide a soup and everyone else provides sandwiches, salads, breads.  This week we’ll be having Hearty 16-Bean Soup

Hallee


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pumpkin stuffed wild rice

Winter Squash Stuffed with Wild Rice, Toasted Pecans & Dried Cherries

Winter Squash Stuffed with Wild Rice, Toasted Pecans & Dried Cherries

I love finding a recipe that will be my new go-to recipe for entertaining.  We had company for dinner, and since we’re observing a Daniel Fast, this was our main course using acorn squash.  The next evening, we served a soup and had this as a side using pumpkins.  The rice is amazing alone, but pared with the winter squash, it is remarkable.  This would be beautiful gracing any holiday table.

INGREDIENTS:

6 acorn squashes or 20 mini-pumpkins
2 TBS plus 1 TBS olive oil, divided
2 medium onions
3 stalks celery
½ tsp dried sage
½ tsp salt
2 cups wild rice blend (I used Lundberg Wild Rice Blend)
3 cups vegetable stock
¾ cup pecans
½ cup dried cherries
1 cup scallion greens
salt and pepper, to taste

SUPPLIES:

sharp knife and cutting board
measuring cups/spoons
medium bowl for soaking rice
strainer
pastry brush
skillet
cookie sheet with parchment paper
oven-proof skillet with lid

PREPARATION:

Cover the rice with water and soak for several hours.  Drain.

Cut the acorn squash in half and scrape out the seeds and membranes.  Or, cut the tops off of the pumpkins and scoop out the seeds and the membranes, reserving the tops.

Brush the insides of the squash with 2 TBS olive oil.

Cover cookie sheet with parchment paper.  Place the squash cut side down on the paper.

Chop the celery and dice the onion.

Preheat oven to 425° degrees F (220° degrees C)

DIRECTIONS:

In an oven-proof pan, heat the remaining 1 TBS of olive oil over medium-high heat.

Cook, stirring regularly, until the vegetables are transluscent.

Add the salt and the sage.

Mix well.

Stir in the rice and cook for two or three minutes to toast it.

Add the vegetable stock.

Stir and cover with lid.

Place the squash and the rice in preheated 425° degrees F oven for 45 minutes or until the liquids have absorbed in the rice and the flesh of the squash is tender.  Remove from oven.  Let the rice sit for 10 minutes.

While the rice is sitting, heat a small skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the pecans and toast about two or three minutes, stirring constantly.

Remove from heat and roughly chop the pecans.  Chop the cherries.  Slice the scallion greens.

Add the pecans, cherries, and scallion greens to the rice.  Mix well.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

Place the squash in the serving dish.

Spoon the rice mixture into the squash.

YIELD:

about 12 main servings, about 20 side dishes

NUTRITION: ~*~
Low in saturated fat
No cholesterol
Low in sodium
Low in sugar
High in vitamin C
~*~
NOTES:

I would love to hear any feedback about this recipe. Did you make it? Did you enjoy it? Did you make any adjustments to it?

Hallee


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Menu Monday

Menu Monday – 24 OCT 11 – Daniel Fast Week 3

Menu Monday

Menu for the week of 24 October 2011

The “rules” of our household diet can be found in the tab above labeled Hallee’s Galley and further explained in Our Diet.

I usually serve leftovers for lunch the next day, or we’ll save them during the week to graze lunch on the weekends. One meal a week, we eat whatever we want. This is usually our “Dinner Out” meal.

Almost all of the breads are homemade using fresh milled flour.  I’ll continue to link to my recipes as I post them.  Our daily bread is Whole Wheat Honey Oatmeal Bread.

Here’s the menu for my family for the week of October 24th.  I have some pumpkin leftover from my Winter Squash Stuffed with Wild Rice, Dried Cherries, and Roasted Pecans (the recipe will go up this week), and the boys are begging me to make pumpkin cookies.

Our church is currently observing 40 days of fasting, and Gregg and I decided that we would do a Daniel Fast.  For the next few weeks, you will see a “vegan extreme” diet.  We are consuming only fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and drinking only water – no sugars, honey, syrups, nor eating leavened bread.  Kaylee is observing her own form of this fast and will be abstaining from the sugars and the meat – she will be consuming dairy, however.  The boys will be eating our meals with us, but will have some meat and will have dairy.

For breakfast, we are making a juice in our juicer out of kale, carrots, apples, and fresh ginger root.  Several good juice recipes can be found here.  I’ve also been making smoothies out of mango, fresh pineapple, bananas, oatmeal, flax seed, and coconut milk.  We drink one or both of them for our breakfast.

For lunches, we will be eating hummus with fresh vegetables, avocado and salsa in Ezekiell 4:9 tortillas (the only tortillas I could find with nothing in them but grains), salads, or something like unsweetened peanut butter and bananas with tortillas.

I pray that by sharing our journey with you, you will receiving a blessing from it.


Monday:

 

Breakfast:

The kids will be getting beef bacon, scrambled eggs, and fresh fruit

Dinner:

Hearty 16-Bean Soup (with no smoked turkey leg), garden salad

Tuesday:

Breakfast:

breakfast at McDonalds with the church youth group

Dinner:

grilled eggplant, Mushroom & Barley Risotto (recipe to follow), , roasted asparagus, garden salad

Wednesday:

Breakfast:

the kids will be getting corned beef hash, fried eggs, and fresh fruit

Dinner:

Jen’s Crockpot Ratatouille (recipe to follow), garden salad

Thursday:

Breakfast:

the kids will be having Old Fashioned Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancakes, turkey sausage, and fresh fruit

Dinner:

Whole Grain Spaghetti with Beets and Greens (recipe to follow), garden salad

Friday:

Breakfast:

the kids will be having Stuffed French Toast

Dinner:

Pinto Beans, Collard Greens (method to follow), Family Fit Fried Potatoes,

Saturday:

Breakfast:

cold cereal

Dinner:

Trunk or Treat at Church — dinner out with family

Sunday:

Breakfast:

The kids will be having scrambled eggs, toast, and fresh fruit

Dinner:

Small group in our home.  I provide a soup and everyone else provides sandwiches, salads, breads.  I’ll be making Garbanzos and Fennel Stew (recipe to follow)

Hallee


I’m so grateful for your visit, today.
You would bless me if you added me to your Subscribe via any Reader feed reader or subscribed Subscribe via Email via email.
You can also become a fan on Become a Facebook Fan Facebook or follow me on Follow me on Twitter Twitter. I would love to see more of you!

 


This post linked to…

 

orgjunkie.com

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