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the sick house

Posted by Hallee on Oct 23, 2009 in Blog Stuff, Life, Parenting |
Scott, waiting for me to get his shoes so that we could go to the doctor.  He got tired of standing and waiting, so he laid down on the dog's bed.

Scott, waiting for me to put shoes on Jeb so that we could go to the doctor. He got tired of standing and waiting, so he laid down on the dog's bed.

My house has been the sick house this week. We were in Chicago on vacation, and the day after we got home, my daughter came home from school complaining of a sore throat. By that night, her temperature had spiked. The next morning, my son woke up lethargic and throwing up.

I’ve not followed my menu too closely, I’m not entirely certain I’ve made my bed one time this week (Kaylee has taken up residence in my room with one of the computers and a TiVo) and I’ve not been really proactive with the blog. Other than the trip to the doctor Wednesday morning, I’ve not gone anywhere or done anything or even looked at another adult and am starting to feel a little bit isolated from the real world.  It’s just been that kind of week.

Our pediatrician said that they’re not usually this busy until January with flu season. He is not looking forward to the next few months.

Is there anything we can do about it? According to the CDC, we can battle back with these three steps:


Take time to get a flu vaccine.

  • CDC recommends a yearly seasonal flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against seasonal influenza.
  • While there are many different flu viruses, the seasonal flu vaccine protects against the three seasonal viruses that research suggests will be most common.
  • Vaccination is especially important for people at high risk of serious flu complications, including young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older.
  • Seasonal flu vaccine also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from making them sick.
  • A seasonal vaccine will not protect you against 2009 H1N1.
  • A new vaccine against 2009 H1N1 is being made.
  • People at greatest risk for 2009 H1N1 infection include children, pregnant women, and people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease.
  • Ask your doctor if you should get a 2009 H1N1 vaccine.



Take everyday preventive actions.

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.*
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other measures to keep our distance from each other to lessen the spread of flu.



Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor recommends them.

  • If you get seasonal or 2009 H1N1 flu, antiviral drugs can treat the flu.
  • Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) that fight against the flu by keeping flu viruses from reproducing in your body.
  • The priority use for antiviral drugs this season is to treat people who are very sick (hospitalized) or people who are sick with flu-like symptoms and who are at increased risk of serious flu complications, such as pregnant women, young children, people 65 and older and people with chronic health conditions. (Most people have been able to recover at home from 2009 H1N1 without needing medical care and the same is true of seasonal flu.)
  • Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications.
  • Antiviral drugs are not sold over-the-counter and are different from antibiotics.
  • For treatment, antiviral drugs work best if started within the first 2 days of symptoms.
  • Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, including 2009 H1N1 and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.
  • Visit the CDC 2009 H1N1 website to find out what to do if you get sick with the flu and how to care for someone at home who is sick with the flu.

Hallee


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